Topical steroid ointment or cream

The obvious priority is immediate discontinuation of any further topical corticosteroid use. Protection and support of the impaired skin barrier is another priority. Eliminating harsh skin regimens or products will be necessary to minimize potential for further purpura or trauma, skin sensitivity, and potential infection. Steroid Atrophy [10] [11] is often permanent, though if caught soon enough and the topical corticosteroid discontinued in time, the degree of damage may be arrested or slightly improve. However, while the accompanying Telangectasias may improve marginally, the Striae is permanent and irreversible. [1]

Please remember that each skin care product may work differently for different people. Some may find significant, immediate and prolonged relief for itch, while others find mild to moderate relief and yet others may not see any benefits. Likewise, some may find a product that deliver tremendous skin improvement after 2 weeks of use, others may seen a similar benefits after 6-8 weeks. Of course, there are those who just need to find alternative products for relief. That is why you need to try and find the products that work for you. Check out the http:///resources/ where there are other good resources.

A common mistake is to be too cautious about topical steroids. Some parents undertreat their children's eczema because of an unfounded fear of topical steroids. They may not apply the steroid as often as prescribed, or at the strength needed to clear the flare-up. This may actually lead to using more steroid in the long term, as the inflamed skin may never completely clear. So, you may end up applying a topical steroid on and off (perhaps every few days) for quite some time. The child may be distressed or uncomfortable for this period if the inflammation does not clear properly. A flare-up is more likely to clear fully if topical steroids are used correctly.

Transdermal patches can be a very precise time released method of delivering a drug. Cutting a patch in half might affect the dose delivered. The release of the active component from a transdermal delivery system (patch) may be controlled by diffusion through the adhesive which covers the whole patch, by diffusion through a membrane which may only have adhesive on the patch rim or drug release may be controlled by release from a polymer matrix. Cutting a patch might cause rapid dehydration of the base of the medicine and affect the rate of diffusion.

Weaker topical steroids are utilized for thin- skinned and sensitive areas, especially areas under occlusion, such as the armpit, groin, buttock crease, breast folds. Weaker steroids are used on the face, eyelids, diaper area, perianal skin, and intertrigo of the groin or body folds. Moderate steroids are used for atopic dermatitis , nummular eczema , xerotic eczema , lichen sclerosis et atrophicus of the vulva , scabies (after scabiecide) and severe dermatitis . Strong steroids are used for psoriasis , lichen planus , discoid lupus , chapped feet, lichen simplex chronicus , severe poison ivy exposure, alopecia areata , nummular eczema, and severe atopic dermatitis in adults. [1]

The most common side effect of topical corticosteroid use is skin atrophy. All topical steroids can induce atrophy, but higher potency steroids, occlusion, thinner skin, and older patient age increase the risk. The face, the backs of the hands, and intertriginous areas are particularly susceptible. Resolution often occurs after discontinuing use of these agents, but it may take months. Concurrent use of topical tretinoin (Retin-A) % may reduce the incidence of atrophy from chronic steroid applications. 30 Other side effects from topical steroids include permanent dermal atrophy, telangiectasia, and striae.

Topical steroid ointment or cream

topical steroid ointment or cream

Transdermal patches can be a very precise time released method of delivering a drug. Cutting a patch in half might affect the dose delivered. The release of the active component from a transdermal delivery system (patch) may be controlled by diffusion through the adhesive which covers the whole patch, by diffusion through a membrane which may only have adhesive on the patch rim or drug release may be controlled by release from a polymer matrix. Cutting a patch might cause rapid dehydration of the base of the medicine and affect the rate of diffusion.

Media:

topical steroid ointment or creamtopical steroid ointment or creamtopical steroid ointment or creamtopical steroid ointment or creamtopical steroid ointment or cream