Steroid treatment for hives

Acne is often present. Acne conglobata is a particularly severe form of acne that can develop during steroid abuse or even after the drug has been discontinued. Infections are a common side effect of steroid abuse because of needle sharing and unsanitary techniques used when injecting the drugs into the skin. These are similar risks to IV drug abusers with increased potential to acquire blood-borne infections such as hepatitis and HIV/AIDS . Skin abscesses may occur at injection sites and may spread to other organs of the body. Endocarditis or an infection of the heart valves is not uncommon.

Pathologic phimosis is a common problem throughout the world. In Europe, Asia, South America, and Central America neonatal circumcision is not routinely performed, thus childhood phimosis is not rare. In addition, in the United States and Canada the rates of neonatal circumcision, estimated to be 60% to 90%, 5 are declining. 9 Thus, even in the United States and Canada, phimosis is a commonly faced problem. Obviously, one of the difficulties that arises when studying phimosis is the lack of a clear definition and differentiation between a pathologic phimosis and a physiologic nonretractile foreskin. 10 In our study, nonretractable and pinpoint prepuces correspond to type II and type I of the classification by Kayaba et al. 11 The cases classified as ''retractable'' phimosis might not be considered pathologic by others because of a potential for spontaneous resolution with increasing age. However, all patients included in our study were originally referred for circumcision, they all had a constrictive ring for which they had sought medical attention, and they would have been considered candidates for circumcision if topical therapy had not been offered. [CIRP note: These doctors show the common inability to distinguish between normal in childhood developmentally narrow foreskin and a pathological condition called phimosis.]

The most commonly used AAS in medicine are testosterone and its various esters (but most commonly testosterone undecanoate , testosterone enanthate , testosterone cypionate , and testosterone propionate ), [53] nandrolone esters (most commonly nandrolone decanoate and nandrolone phenylpropionate ), stanozolol , and metandienone (methandrostenolone). [1] Others also available and used commonly but to a lesser extent include methyltestosterone , oxandrolone , mesterolone , and oxymetholone , as well as drostanolone propionate , metenolone (methylandrostenolone), and fluoxymesterone . [1] Dihydrotestosterone (DHT; androstanolone, stanolone) and its esters are also notable, although they are not widely used in medicine. [54] Boldenone undecylenate and trenbolone acetate are used in veterinary medicine . [1]

No flush, no foul. If your treatment is done and you have tablets left over, give them to your doctor or a pharmacist. Don't flush them down the toilet or throw them away because they could get into the water supply and cause problems. Reviewed by: Christopher N. Frantz, MD Date reviewed: October 2012

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Steroid treatment for hives

steroid treatment for hives

No flush, no foul. If your treatment is done and you have tablets left over, give them to your doctor or a pharmacist. Don't flush them down the toilet or throw them away because they could get into the water supply and cause problems. Reviewed by: Christopher N. Frantz, MD Date reviewed: October 2012

  • For Teens
  • For Kids
  • For Parents
MORE ON THIS TOPIC
  • Cancer Basics
  • Cancer: Readjusting to Home and School
  • When Cancer Keeps You Home
  • Cancer Center
  • Dealing With Cancer
  • Contact Us
  • Print
  • Resources
  • Send to a Friend
  • Permissions Guidelines

Note: Clicking these links will take you to a site outside of KidsHealth's control.





  • About TeensHealth
  • Reading BrightStart!
  • Contact Us
  • Partners
  • Editorial Policy
  • Privacy Policy & Terms of Use
  • Notice of Nondiscrimination
Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on TeensHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor.

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