Septic and aseptic complications of corticosteroid injections

Things cleaned specifically in a way that prevents infection were first described as aseptic in the late 19th century. The word combines the prefix a-, meaning "not," and septic, from Greek sēptikos, meaning "putrifying." Aseptic was preceded by more than a century by antiseptic (from anti-, meaning "opposing," and sēptikos ), which entered English with the meaning "opposing sepsis, putrefaction, or decay." Both words can also be used, like sterile, to suggest a lack of emotion, warmth, or interest. Evelyn Toynton used aseptic thus in The New York Times Book Review , November 22, 1987: "It's hard not to feel that an element of romance has been lost, that the vast chilly reaches of outer space are a pretty aseptic substitute for the shadowy depths under the ground.…"

The basic principle of steam infusion is to heat a product by passing it through an atmosphere of steam. The product's spreading system may vary, but the resulting milk droplet size must be uniform, to maintain a steady heat transfer rate. The steam infusion process is similar to steam injection system but gentler (less shear) which gives greater product stability. It is therefore especially good for whipping cream and products containing stabilizers. However, it requires more steam, cooling water and additional product losses which leads to a 4 – 8 % higher operating cost than steam injection.

Septic and aseptic complications of corticosteroid injections

septic and aseptic complications of corticosteroid injections

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