Generation s tales for a steroid culture

But that doesn’t explain why the teenage Zuckerberg gave away his free app for an MP3 player (similar to the very popular Pandora, as it recognized your taste in music), rather than selling it to Microsoft. What power was he hoping to accrue to himself in high school, at seventeen? Girls, was it? Except the girl motivation is patently phony—with a brief interruption Zuckerberg has been dating the same Chinese-American, now a medical student, since 2003, a fact the movie omits entirely. At the end of the film, when all the suing has come to an end (“Pay them. In the scheme of things it’s a parking ticket”), we’re offered a Zuckerberg slumped before his laptop, still obsessed with the long-lost Erica, sending a “Friend request” to her on Facebook, and then refreshing the page, over and over, in expectation of her reply…. Fincher’s contemporary window-dressing is so convincing that it wasn’t until this very last scene that I realized the obvious progenitor of this wildly enjoyable, wildly inaccurate biopic. Hollywood still believes that behind every mogul there’s an idée fixe: Rosebud—meet Erica.

A dark snapshot of the trio's highly fortressed inner world quickly emerges--landscapes peopled with dead TV shows, "Elvis moments," and semi-disposable Swedish furniture. And from these landscapes, deeper portraits emerge, those of fanatically independent individuals, pathologically ambivalent about the future and brimming with unsatisfied longings for permanence, for love, and for their own home. Andy, Dag, and Claire are underemployed, overeducated, intensely private, and unpredictable. Like the group they mirror, they have nowhere to assuage their fears, and no culture to replace their anomie.

In mid-2010, Girls' Generation signed with Nayutawave Records (present-day EMI Records Japan ), which is a division of Universal Music Japan , to venture out to the Japanese music scene. [46] Their debut release in Japan was a DVD titled New Beginning of Girls' Generation , released in August 2011, which features seven of the group's music videos and a special bonus footage. [47] The DVD debuted at number four on the Japanese Oricon DVD Chart on August 23, 2010; [48] in doing so, Girls' Generation became the first Korean girl group to earn a top-five DVD on the Oricon chart. [49] It has sold 60,000 copies in Japan and was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of Japan (RIAJ). [1] [50] In September 2010, Girls' Generation released the Japanese version of " Genie " as their debut single in Japan. [1] It peaked at number four on the Japanese Oricon Singles Chart and was certified platinum for digital sales exceeding 250,000 units by the RIAJ. [51] [52] The following month, the group released their second Japanese single, " Gee ", which reached number two on the Oricon Singles Chart. [1] "Gee" became the first single by a non-Japanese girl group to enter the top three of the Oricon chart since 1980. [53] It is the group's most successful single in Japan, selling 207,000 copies and achieving a million certification for sales figures standing at one million units by the RIAJ. [54] [55] Amidst their Japanese activities, they also participated in the SMTown Live '10 World Tour alongside their labelmates, which started on August 21 at Seoul Jamsil Olympic Stadium . [56]

Yet if what makes Japan seem so foreign and incomprehensible to most Westerners is its insularity, homogeneity, and lockstep conformity, then it would seem logical that this syndrome—where the young try to escape that singularly compressed and restrictive life—may exist only in Japan. And since every social system is likely to foster its own unique afflictions, investigating this unusual behavior could lead me to deeper truths about Japan and its current malaise. My journalist's intuition was essentially confirmed by Satoru Saito, one of Japan's most prominent psychiatrists, who has practiced psychotherapy and taught psychoanalysis for years. An avuncular, gentle man who wears sweaters and smokes a pipe, Saito counsels dozens of hikikomori patients, as well as abusive husbands and troubled families, at the Institute for Family Function, his narrow concrete slab of a clinic in Tokyo's Azabu neighborhood. Saito is one of many specialists who also see Jun's and Kenji's and the other hikikomoris ' social isolation as reflecting a rational, Japanese style of coping.

Generation s tales for a steroid culture

generation s tales for a steroid culture

Yet if what makes Japan seem so foreign and incomprehensible to most Westerners is its insularity, homogeneity, and lockstep conformity, then it would seem logical that this syndrome—where the young try to escape that singularly compressed and restrictive life—may exist only in Japan. And since every social system is likely to foster its own unique afflictions, investigating this unusual behavior could lead me to deeper truths about Japan and its current malaise. My journalist's intuition was essentially confirmed by Satoru Saito, one of Japan's most prominent psychiatrists, who has practiced psychotherapy and taught psychoanalysis for years. An avuncular, gentle man who wears sweaters and smokes a pipe, Saito counsels dozens of hikikomori patients, as well as abusive husbands and troubled families, at the Institute for Family Function, his narrow concrete slab of a clinic in Tokyo's Azabu neighborhood. Saito is one of many specialists who also see Jun's and Kenji's and the other hikikomoris ' social isolation as reflecting a rational, Japanese style of coping.

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