Bronchiolitis in infants steroids

These guidelines are provided only as assistance for physicians making clinical decisions regarding the care of their patients. As such, they cannot substitute the individual judgment brought to each clinical situation by the patient’s family physician. As with all clinical reference resources, they reflect the best understanding of the science of medicine at the time of publication, but they should be used with the clear understanding that continued research may result in new knowledge and recommendations. These guidelines are only one element in the complex process of improving the health of America. To be effective, the guidelines must be implemented.

Bronchiolitis is a common cause of illness and is the leading cause of hospitalization in infants and young children. Treatment includes measures to ensure that the child consumes adequate fluids and is able to breathe without significant difficulty. Most children begin to improve two to five days after first developing breathing difficulties, but wheezing can last for a week or longer. Bronchiolitis can cause serious illness in some children. Infants who are very young, born early, have lung or heart disease, or have difficulty fighting infections or handling oral secretions are more likely to have severe disease with bronchiolitis. It is important to be aware of the signs and symptoms that require evaluation and treatment.

Bronchiolitis usually starts with a runny nose and congestion. Within 2-3 days, the patient starts coughing, wheezing, and potentially breathing hard. The wheezing and tight breathing usually become worse over 2-3 days and then begin to improve. Overall, the wheeze may last up to 7 days, and the cough up to two weeks. The most common complication (which occurs in about 20% of infants) is an ear infection. A lesser complication (which occurs in about 1-2% of children) is bacterial pneumonia. Fever usually comes at the beginning of the infection. If your child develops a new fever over for more than 24 hours later in the course of the illness, it may signify a secondary infection, and your child should be seen.

      Bronchiolitis is an inflammation of the bronchioles.

Bronchiolitis in infants steroids

bronchiolitis in infants steroids

      Bronchiolitis is an inflammation of the bronchioles.

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